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Equality and Diversity

 

Equality and Diversity - Key Stage 3&4

Guidance

EQUALITY ACT 2010, ADVICE FOR SCHOOL LEADERS, SCHOOL STAFF, GOVERNING BODIES AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES (Governmental advice)

 

 

Resources

 

50th Anniversery of Martin Luther King's Visit to the UK

 

A set of teaching resources inspired by Dr Martin Luther King Jr. has been created to help young people today think about the issues of racism, poverty and war.Aimed at students aged 7 – 16, the free pack contains lesson activities and ideas to help them explore the legacy of Martin Luther King and the civil rights movement.

It has been created by researchers at Newcastle University, working with colleagues at Northumbria University, staff and students at Archbishop Runcie C of E First School, Newcastle, Gosforth Central School, Newcastle, Ovingham First School, Northumberland and the Newcastle University-based Martin Luther King Peace Committee.

The materials include lesson plans, hand-outs, worksheets, music recordings and presentation slides for lessons covering a wide range of subjects including history, RE, geography, English, PSHE, music, drama, art and even chemistry. It also includes material for assemblies and ideas for themed weeks.

Click on the title above to access this resource.

 

 

Mental Health & Physical Disability - this resource comprises a mix of materials that aim to help tackle student prejudice/ misconceptions around mental health/ physical disability. Baseline data can be gathered from the questionnaire ‘I think that…’.The PowerPoint and Creature Comfort activities can be used to help students understand physical and mental health issues.

 

Coming Out - support for lesbian, gay & bisexual young people

 

Young Stonewall

Gender Identity Research & Education Society

Transgender PowerPoint

A teaching resource for Secondary Science developed by Gender Matters and, Gender Identity Research & Education Society (GIRES)

E learning trailer above features resources and film

School Diversity Week: 2nd July - 6th July 2018

 

 

This toolkit has been created with help from our Teacher Advisory Group to make celebrating School Diversity Week as easy as possible.

Click here to view the full toolkit which includes: recommended reading, poems, videos & films. Also included:

  1. Easy-to-use ideas for school-wide events celebrating LGBT+ equality
  2. Advice on empowering your students to set up a Social Action Team
  3. KS1-KS4 lesson plans covering LGBT+ issues
  4. Subject specific lesson plans
  5. Extracurricular resources including facts, book lists, articles, films and videos
  6. FAQs to help explain the aims of the week
  7. Letter templates about your school’s involvement for parents, staff and governors

 Come Out for Trans Equality

 

 

 

 

 

 

The fight for equality is far from over.  Speak up for trans rights and help reform the gender recognition act. Whether it's downloading A Vision For Change, contacting your MP about the Gender Recognition Act or signing up to hear more about what Stonewall is doing, there are plenty of ways to Come Out For Trans people. Click here to read more.

 

      

On Saturday 07.07.18 a transphobic group of eight women staged a protest at Pride in London.

They sought to sow division in our community, particularly pitting people who identify as cis-lesbian. We need trans people and every trans ally to show their support for trans equality at this critical time. Please respond to the Government consultation on Gender Recognition Act reform and use our top tips for responding to the most crucial questions. Tell people on social media that you have responded, and to #ComeOutForTransEquality and do the same. If we all come together and demonstrate how few in number the transphobes are, the momentum for reform will be unstoppable. Reform of the Gender Recognition Act is the gateway to more progress towards trans equality. And it’s vital to keep on track with our ultimate goal, that every LGBT+ person is accepted for who they are, no exceptions.

 

The UK government's consultation to reform the Gender Recognition Act (GRA) is a real opportunity to improve trans people's rights. The GRA governs how trans people can have their identity legally recognised. This was groundbreaking in its time – it’s now seriously out of date and needs reform. 

The current GRA doesn't allow for non-binary identities to be legally recognised. Non-binary is an umbrella term for people whose gender identity doesn’t sit comfortably with ‘man’ or ‘woman’. Non-binary identities are varied and can include people who identify with some aspects of binary identities, while others reject them entirely.

Read Frankie’s story on why reform matters to them.

The current Gender Recognition Act doesn’t work at all for me. I’m 17, so I’m too young to apply (you have to be 18). I think It should be easier for younger trans people to get a Gender Recognition Certificate. We should be trusted to make the decisions only we can make, especially as there’s very little consequence to anybody else.  As a non-binary trans person, I want to be legally recognised. That’s why GRA reform must include recognition for genderqueer and other non-binary identities. Legal recognition would normalise us and help end discrimination.  I dream of acceptance. I dream of not having to read ignorant and prejudiced coverage of trans issues in the news every day. I dream of not worrying if a new friend will treat me differently once I ask them to use they/them pronouns.  I believe all this will happen. Eventually. And improving legal recognition for all trans people is a crucial step towards creating a society that doesn’t just tolerate trans people but loves and cherishes us.   Change starts with you. By responding to the consultation you can make a difference today that will have a huge impact on the future of trans rights.   

Better legal recognition isn’t the only thing that will improve trans people’s experiences, but it is an important step forward. Read why it matters to other trans people here.

 

Trans Inclusion Schools Toolkit Version 3, September 2018  This toolkit was first published in 2014 and disseminated to Brighton & Hove educational settings who found it useful to inform practice and to support trans and gender questioning pupils and students in their communities. We know from feedback from trans children and young people that many of them feel well supported in Brighton & Hove educational settings.The first edition also received positive feedback from other local authorities and schools who have then used it as a basis for similar policies or guidance. Since 2014 there has been an increase in children and young people coming out as trans and non-binary and an increase in different ways that young people self-identify in terms of gender. There has been a lot of discussion in the media and wider about how best to support trans and gender questioning children and young people and if and how to raise awareness of gender identity across the whole community. We recognise that this is a developing area of practice and remain open to discussion about these issues and will adapt our approach accordingly.

This toolkit has been written by Ryan Gingell, Allsorts Youth Project and Sam Beal,Brighton & Hove City Council in consultation with trans children and young people and their families.

  

 

 

Article from the Telegraph 08.10.18:

Parents who refuse to let their son wear a skirt to school may need to be referred to social services, a council’s guidance has advised schools. Read the full story

 

 

 

 

Stonewall Primary Best Practice Guide

How primary schools are celebrating difference and tackling homophobia

Stonewall Inclusive Curriculum Guide

Bi Visibility Day 2017 - 23rd September

Bi Visibility Day, also known as International Celebrate Bisexuality Day, has been marked each year since 1999 to highlight biphobia and to help people find the bisexual community. Every year on the 23rd of September, BVD celebrated bi people, while recognising the work still required to make biphobia a thing of the past. For a briefing based on data from Stonewall's health research into the health needs and experiences of bisexual people in Britain click here. Below we have series of posters highlighting Bi Visibility Champions, and some of the work they do:  

Mermaids

Mermaid Trans* Inclusion Schools Toolkit - Supporting transgender and gender questioning children and young people in East Sussex schools and colleges.

 

 

 

What not to say to LGBT pupils if they come out - an article from The Guardian 

Back to School Programs for Parents, Professionals and Youth - August 2018

All children are affected by the messages they receive about gender: from simple things like “blue is for boys, pink is for girls,” to the ways we encourage youth to pursue activities and academic subjects consistent with society’s notions about gender.

Click here to view the Blog from Gender Spectrum which includes various videos.

 

 

Articles

18/10/17 TES - 'The best schools have an ethos that includes the head, teachers, governors, the children and parents At the very core of all successful schools – we're told – is the desire to continuously improve. Unfortunately, this drive for constant improvement can bring with it very major problems, especially when it's forced on schools by their many masters. Why have we forgotten that the only way a school can improve in a sustainable way is if all its teachers, leaders, staff, children, parents and governors are work together with a common goal?

EACH - Educational Action Challenging Homophobia

EACH is a charity providing training, resources and support services to affirm the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans or questioning (LGBT+) people. Posters available to down for free on the website.  Also SAFESPACE stickers to purchase. Click here to visit the website

Gender Matter Resources from EACH - Educational Action Challenging Homophobia

 

Resources to tackle homophobic bullying in schools Click on the links below.

/Trans & gender questioning.pdf

/Gender Matters Resource 2 Girls Version.pdf

/Gender Matters Resource 3 boys version.pdf

Equali-tea

Hold an Equali-tea and raise vital funds for LGBT equality. Click here for full details where you can order your FREE Equali-tea pack which is available from Stonewall 

LGBT in Britain - Home and Communities

Stonewall's LGBT in Britain - Home and Communities research report highlights deep challenges for the LGBT community, with alarming levels of racism experienced by black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) LGBT people, and a significant proportion of trans people, bi people, LGBT disabled people and LGBT people of faith feeling excluded within the LGBT community. Click here to read the full report

Tech Abuse: Gender and IoT (G-IoT) Resource List - July 2018

This resource list is intended as supplementary material to better inform and guide victims of technology-facilitated abuse as well as those working with them.

It lists organisations which produce guidelines and advice, and highlights known methods of abuse which perpetrators may exploit.

The resource list has been developed by a socio-technical research team at University College London. Click on the image to view the full list.

 

 

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