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Counselling

 

 

 

 

 

If your child needs counselling, it doesn't mean you've failed.

Life is a struggle for many children and young people in today’s world. Thousands of parents and carers contact us to get support for their child. You’re not alone.

Many children and young people find that being able to speak confidentially to a counsellor who isn’t in their close circle of friends and family, can really help. This is where TIC+ comes in. Our counsellors are qualified professionals who are experienced at working with children and young people. They care about what they do and want the best outcome for your child. They will not judge you or anyone in your family. Click on the logo for more

Depression 

A Parents Guide to Depression; contains a summarised list of warning signs, advice and links to agencies for further support if you suspect that your child may be suffering from depression. The information explains how a referral should progress from initial enquiry to treatment. It is important to note that isolated symptoms or signs should not be taken out of context. If you have any concerns please call 111.

Mental Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

As part of our 'You're never too young to talk mental health' campaign we have produced a new resource for parents and carers to help start the difficult conversation.

Click on the image to access these resources.

There is more related content and a fantastic video halfway down the page!  MindEd - click for a comprehensive resource centre aimed at parents coping with their children in all walks of their lives.

My Mum's got a Dodgy Brain from ForMed Films on Vimeo.

A film for children made by children who have a parent with a mental health problem, made in collaboration with Devon Partnership NHS trust.

Duchess of Cambridge to launch pilot mental health website to help primary schools support pupils   Kate will give the green light to the initiative during a visit to a London primary school helping to trial the online portal coordinated and financed by the duchess’ Royal Foundation.     Click this link to find out more http://www.headstogether.org.uk/schools 
& follow @heads_together on Instagram for live updates

Having a conversation with parents and carers about mental health

A Beginner's Guide for Schools.  Developed with YoungMinds', Teachers' Insight Group (May 2019)

Mental health is a very emotional subject to talk about. This is especially true of conversations between teachers and parents and carers, whether they have approached you, or you have encouraged them to think about their family’s mental health yourself. Click here to view the full resource.

 

 

 

Self harm

Coping with Self-Harm - A Guide for Parents and Carers developed by researchers at the University of Oxford.  Includes information on the nature and causes of self-harm, how to support a young person when facing this problem and what help is available. 

Family Lives offers a guide to understanding self-harm, practical suggestions and links to further support. 

The NSPCC's guide to self-harm find out how to spot the signs and what you can do to help.

Understanding Young Minds is a free resource pack which includes a poster, an infographic, an email footer, an image to share on social media and a website banner.

Suicide

Know the Signs: information on suicide and self-harm for parents from the Samaritans

Papyrus is a national charity for the prevention of young suicide.

 

A registered charity which has been running a crisis centre since 2013. Providing face to face support to people who are at risk of suicide, we are totally independent. We know from speaking with families that the inquest can be a daunting prospect. Families can get support on how to cope after suicide, when it can get very confusing with so many unanswered questions.

 

The Staying Safe website is a potentially life-saving resource developed by 4 Mental Health, with invaluable with invaluable input from our Expert Reference Group of international academics, people with lived experience (including of surviving a suicide attempt, self-harm, supporting a friend or family member or bereavement by suicide), suicide prevention experts, mental health practitioners, general practitioners, policy makers, public health experts, sector experts, educationalists and concerned citizens.

StayingSafe.net offers compassion, kindness and easy ways to help keep people safer from thoughts of harm and suicide, seek support and discover hope of recovery through powerful videos from people with personal experience.

The website provides vital ‘Safety Plan' guidance tools jointly funded by NHS England, with easy to print / online templates and guidance video tutorials purposefully designed to help people through the process of writing their own Safety Plan to build hope, identify actions and strategies to resist suicidal thoughts and develop positive ways to cope with stress and emotional distress.

Tragically, suicide takes far too many lives, yet suicide is preventable. Anyone struggling to cope or experiencing deep distress may begin to think about harming themselves and consider suicide as a means to escape their emotional pain. It can be incredibly difficult to think clearly during these times. Everyone is encouraged to PREPARE for possible difficult times ahead BEFORE they happen, by completing a Safety Plan.

Staying safe - safety plan template

Helplines for young people

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